The Clinical Need

Colorectal cancer is the Western world's second largest cancer killer, despite being largely preventable and/or treatable with early screening.

In the U.S. alone, the American Cancer Society estimates that approximately 136,000 people are diagnosed with CRC annually, with roughly 50,000 people dying from the disease. The World Health Organization anticipates that by 2020, there will be nearly 160,000 cases in the U.S. and more than 1.6 million worldwide.

Most of these deaths are preventable2 with screening and treatments.

Optical colonoscopy is currently the standard screening tool for early detection of colon cancer, demonstrating a high degree (approximately 95%) of sensitivity and specificity. However, compliance remains an issue. Many patients still avoid screening due to colonoscopy's invasiveness, discomfort and perceived risks, with bowel prep being a significant drawback. Moreover, in some European countries, fecal occult blood tests (FOBT) is still the first mass screening tool dictated by health officials due to its low cost and simplicity.

These figures underline the importance of a technology that could increase compliance and throughput significantly, without compromising screening accuracy.

Check-Cap's advanced X-ray Radar technology is uniquely positioned to capitalize on this market opportunity:

  1. Patient-friendly - non-invasive and prep-free
  2. Accurate - designed to detect clinically significant polyps with a high degree of sensitivity
  3. Simple - doctors can spend less time on screenings and more time with patients who need therapeutic colonoscopies


1.Source: Screening and Surveillance for the Early Detection of Colorectal Cancer and Adenomatous Polyps, 2008: A Joint Guideline from the American Cancer Society, the US Multi-Society Task Force on Colorectal Cancer, and the American College of Radiology.

2.CRC's Prevention: CRC can largely be prevented by the early detection and removal of adenomatous polyps, and survival is significantly better when CRC is diagnosed while still localized. It is evident that incidence and mortality reductions could be achieved if a greater proportion of adults over age 50 received regular screening. Although prospective randomized trials and observational studies have demonstrated mortality reductions associated with early detection and removal of polyps, many US adults are not receiving regular screening or have never been screened at all.

3.CRC's survival rates: Five-year survival is 90% if the disease is diagnosed while still localized but only 68% for regional disease and only 10% if distant metastases are present. (Screening and Surveillance for the Early Detection of Colorectal Cancer and Adenomatous Polyps, 2008: A Joint Guideline from the American Cancer Society, the US Multi-Society Task Force on Colorectal Cancer, and the American College of Radiology).